This blog is dedicated to the memory of my life partner of nearly thirty years, Dr. Howard G. Hanson-- artist, writer, musician, and teacher-- who with me celebrated a belief that we can achieve whatever we allow ourselves to imagine. This blog reflects the whole person that our lives together enabled.

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Sunday, September 25, 2011

Mountain Waters Revisited

York Study      8" x 10"    Oil on Board
The Georgia mountain streams played a large role in my making these hills my home.  Nothing soothes my soul more than soaking in the sounds and smells of a mountain stream whether a tiny trickle or a roaring river and here we have multitudes of both.  The irony of our mountain waters is in the neutrality to human welfare:  they can be the source of life or death, of health or injury, destruction or creation.

Sometimes how they effect our lives depends upon how we approach these waters; at other times, the forces of nature make their own determination.  

Once again this powerful metaphor has caught my attention and is becoming the theme for another spate of paintings.  This small study is the first in this series.

Enjoy this day.  
Dianne

Sunday, September 18, 2011

A Look Back

"A Look Back"    8" x 10"    Oil on Canvas
SOLD

From my earliest memory, the metaphor of the sheep has been embedded in my brain.  There's no escaping a metaphor that reaches that far back.  There's no redefining it or rationalizing it:  it continues to live in one's psyche in its original form.  

Perhaps it was the unconscious influence of that metaphor that deepened my experience visiting a local sheep farm back April.  Even though I went to watch the shearing, that's not what made the deepest impression on me.  What impressed me was how after the shearing, each sheep made its way back to the pasture without any supervision.  And second to that, the flock's need to identify the newly sheared sheep before becoming comfortable with its re-entering their company.

The first image catching my attention was one of these sheep.  As I was shooting pictures of his returning to the pasture, he turns his head and looks at me.  That's the image that stuck with me.  That's the image that made the deepest impression, that became a new version of an old metaphor.

During the longest summer I remember, I have kept a brush moving by doing therapy paintings, many little paintings I have no intention of signing or showing.  This little piece is the transition between those therapy paintings and getting back to the painting process.  It's a metaphor all unto itself.

Enjoy your day.
Dianne